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Bench dogs allow you to clamp a long workpiece that wouldn't normally fit in the jaws of the bench vise. There's a set of dogs that attach to the vise, and a set that attach on the table, essentially making one really big vise. One application would be holding down a board for hand planing. (Image courtesy of Wikipedia) They're usually in the form of ...


16

In addition to bench dogs (explained well by Doresoom above), there are other devices that use the same holes. A holdfast uses the thickness of the bench to hold down a piece of wood with no additional clamps. You can also get a product called Wonder Dogs that let you apply pressure at odd angles. These combine with your bench to allow clamping work ...


11

is there a general recommended distance between dog holes in both directions? Common sense says that the holes should be spaced from the vice in increments that are less than or equal to the maximum opening of the vice, so that you can clamp any sized object without needing shims. In the crosswise direction, consider how large an object would need to be ...


7

My bench top is made of 2 half inch pieces of MDF that I laminated together with wood glue and screws. I drilled about 8 holes for my brass bench dogs. I have used those bench dogs for over a year now, when using my hand planes and router, etc. I have never noticed any kind of deformation or loosening of the hold due to the qualities of the MDF. Also, MDF ...


3

If you are going to be doing a lot of this kind of thin surfacing work, you might want to invest in a vacuum clamp. When combined with a small vacuum pump, these clamps can hold onto the flat bottom face of the plywood with surprising strength, leaving the top side and edges completely unobstructed and accessible to your plane. There is a concern (raised ...


2

There are several workbench designs that include MDF or plywood tops which are thoroughly perforated with dog holes, almost like big sheets of pegboard. Festool's MFT has a sacrificial MDF top, and the original Paulk Workbench design has a plywood top similarly perforated with dog holes. If you're simply using bench dogs for clamping, any material should ...


2

In some respects end stops (as seen on most planing boards and as built into many good benches) are the ideal for planing thinner stock. You can use dogs as these stops of course, they just need to be a raised to be a hair lower than the surface of the board you're working on. And ideally made of wood or plastic, definitely not metal! But there tends to be ...


2

There is more than one way to avoid tear out. You can drill a small pilot hole all the way through then use your forstner bit to drill from both sides meeting somewhere in the middle. I would choose this method over a router. Another way is to attach a piece of scrap wood to the bottom of bench where the hole will be drilled so when the drill bit is exiting ...


2

How not plumb are they? And in what direction? Even if the router works fine your holes will be sort of oval shaped at the bottom which might make your dogs waggle around annoyingly in use. Personally I would glue 19mm dowels into your bad holes. You might want to drill a small hole all the way through first to let the glue escape and avoid hydraulic lock. ...


1

Alternative recommendation for smoothing without the need for planing stop: a cabinet scraper (card scraper) The other answers look to the work holding issue very well, and can definitely be used with a smoother plane. However, if you are only looking to smoothen, then I recommend an alternative to the plane: a trusty cabinet scraper. Since it is easier to ...


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