12

Pocket hole joinery One of the simplest ideas I could think of to address this would be to flip up the boards vertically and use pocket holes and screws into the legs. Some good examples and picture come from a Community Project post about work benches: Community Project: Lets build a workbench! Highlighting a picture from my unfinished work bench you can ...


12

For most hard woods using a pilot hole the size of the shaft of the screw should be good enough to prevent splitting, since it is the shaft that would be 'pushing' out on the wood. There are some that are hard enough that making the pilot hole larger than the shaft but still smaller than the threads is useful, but these are pretty hard woods and it is ...


12

A couple of things to consider: If you accidentally spill glue on your pieces, the stain will not penetrate it. So, this argues in favor of staining before gluing. However... If you get stain on the joints, the glue will not work (or at least it won't work as well). I think things are typically stained after the fact except in rare circumstances such as ...


12

I prefer to tape up my glue joints, then stain / poly / paint. After that, fix any finishing boo-boos, remove the tape, glue up, and you're good to go. This provides the benefit of getting stain and/or paint / finish in all the nooks and crannies, allows you to fix any drips or bobbles in the finish with everything laying flat, and if you do get some ...


11

I recommend you apply any finishing products before final assembly, but after any gluing or other permanent assembly. Surfaces that are going to be glued together don't need (and shouldn't have) finish as this will weaken the bond, and the glue itself and adjoining wood should protect the wood (choose a suitable glue for the environment). Surfaces that ...


9

Yes, yes and yes. I think some pre-finishing should be done almost routinely, but doing so is not nearly as common as it could be. It should be said that the type of the finish plays a big part in how important pre-finishing can be, if you're wiping on a penetrating finish for example it's far less beneficial than it would be if you were spraying lacquer ...


9

You can apply finish at whatever time is easiest to do so. Sometimes you will want to sand and finish one side of a board before final assembly, if it would be difficult to reach afterwards. The insides of small boxes are much easier to sand as flat boards than after they are assembled. You do have to take more care in handling already finished boards. ...


8

Glue. SAND Stain/Finish I have had this scenario come up before and the best method I have found thus far is to clean as well as you can while you are gluing, then once the glue is set lightly sand the joints with a fine grit paper (sand evenly across all the board(s). I do this even if I do not see noticeable glue marks prior to finishing as I have ...


8

he suggested that the wood needed to be treated with tung oil, even before I assemble the legs, in order to protect it from expanding and warping over time. No finish will keep wood from expanding and contracting over time. It's in wood's nature to do that, and there's nothing you can do to prevent it. Also, tung oil isn't all that great at sealing ...


7

I always glue up my stuff first, and I always sand all the joints after I'm done to make sure they are even and any glue that was on the outside of the joint is removed so the wood will take a stain and not be blocked.


7

There is a reason it is called 'finishing' it is the last step to complete or 'finish' your project. Sanding can be done at different stages, usually you won't sand a piece before you glue a flat surface together. So if you are gluing a table top you will want to glue all the pieces together first, then sand them all, because often you will need to sand ...


7

REDUCING MOVEMENT Using finish While you can coat wood with a suitable finish to mitigate the effects of internal moisture changes as humidity goes up and down, for all intents and purposes consider it impossible to prevent it entirely. The finishes that do the best job at reducing the effects are film finishes, which as their name suggests literally ...


6

The answer is "yes". Depends on the piece, finish, tools and your preferred way of working. It's common to pre-finish parts that will be hard to reach after assembly, It's common to finish sub-components like doors, especially when you havd many of them and can work assembly line style. Outside of that, as you say, it's all trade-offs. Prefinishing means ...


6

How much space is taken up by the glue between two pieces? 1mm per side? Less? Usually, this thickness of glue in a butt joint is negligible to the point of being zero, at least as far as woodworking tolerances go. Yes, the glue does have some finite thickness, but it's probably on the order of 1/10mm in a properly-clamped joint. Trying to account for the ...


6

Are there any other hardware options besides two rods bolted to the wood top and wood base? There are many types of bolts that might suit a project like this, depending on the exact design you arrive at. Have a look on BoltDepot for a pretty comprehensive overview of what's available. In theory the entire table could be made from wood, using a hardwood ...


6

The answer is usually "it depends." In some cases where you might need an even finish (like in a waterproofing situation) you might want to finish the pieces before final assembly. I'd argue that for most situations, I wait until the end of the project to finish it, except if visible surfaces would be hard to finish when it is assembled.


6

I've watched many videos in which people glue up panels and such and I've seen them use very little glue with almost no squeeze-out as well as huge amounts of squeeze-out and glue dripping everywhere. I try to minimize squeeze-out; the ability to estimate how much glue to squirt on comes with experience. But when it does squeeze out, I try to come back ...


5

Most people build and then finish (especially if the finish is applied by someone else). Assuming you are diligent, regarding cleaning up the glue as it is pressed out this works fairly well. However if the glue sets then true stains (that is something designed to be absorbed into the wood fibers) will not take to the area covered in glue. Usually, this is a ...


5

I would say that you don't need to account for the space unless your angles will all be exactly, without fault, 90 degrees, and each cut will be accurate within 0.25mm. In other words, woodworking is not the same as designing a car part from metal with very precise tolerances. If you do need that level of precision, I would venture to say that you will ...


4

I agree with this answer that having a zero tolerance precision can make for a big headache in woodworking (This is more true for real wood as it expands and contracts but the point still applies). I offer a design compromise for these inaccuracies. You should be able chamfer the edges of your box to hide and inconsistencies in your external dimensions. An ...


4

Bow it up in the center, this should reduce the overall length allowing you to pull it free. Another person or two would help - have a hand at each end of the board, and pull up on the center. Hopefully the board is flexible enough to wiggle out. You may be able to use clamps to substitute people holding onto the board and a clamp in "expansion mode&...


3

Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane-based adhesive. As such, you might be able to use a solvent that dissolves polyurethane to try to break down the adhesive and remove the glue. Likely you will have to let it sit and constantly reapply the solvent to get the polyurethane to break down. We just had a Question about storing solvents that you will find helpful ...


3

Setting the sides on the base is fine -- good, even -- as long as you have structural support between the floor and the base of the cabinet. That way, the load on the cabinet is being carried by wood, not screws. The way you've seen it elsewhere is generally because the sides go all the way to the floor (thus carrying the load directly through the sheet ...


3

As LosManos said, a picture can be very helpful in these kinds of situations. However, I think I have an idea what you mean. It really has to do with what kind of strength the board need to provide to the case. Melemine does not have a lot of strength to hold a screw from pulling straight out. So if zipping in screws to the bottom is what is mostly going ...


3

In general (IMO) when using plywood paneling like this it can be very hard to treat it like a regular board. So I would recommend (almost always) to frame it where ever it is being used for a panel. (what you are planning on doing with rabbets and slots). No matter how well I try to cut sheet material, I get a little curve on long cuts or just a catch and ...


3

My first guess would be that some of the boards are not four square and flat. Lay a straightedge across the length of each board and make sure it is flat. If you are attaching things with pocket screws, the boards have a tendency to creep a little bit, since the screw is at an angle. If the boards are not well clamped, you can get about 1/16" - 3/32" of ...


3

As others have mentioned in the comments, methods and "connectors" drawn from the "Euro"-cabinetry (aka. flat-pack, knock-down (KD), "modern", and Ikea-style :) tradition are consistent with what you're asking for and also, interestingly, with the general slabbed style of your piece. There's been a lot of innovative work done in that realm since WWII, which ...


3

If the hand method suggested in the answer from Eli Iser does not work, consider to lightly clamp (with pads) each end to the frame underneath. The purpose of the clamps is not to tightly attach it to the frame but to prevent lifting. Create simple wedge shaped shims from scrap wood with a short taper at the front and an extended flat portion for the ...


2

I did some experimenting the other day and found that yellow glue is easy to color with artist's pigment (a fine colored powder use in frescos etc.). I can see that there might be situations where coloring the glue might mitigate problems of glueing first. It depends on the color of the wood. The wood I use is Guanacaste a very dark wood with black ...


2

If the screw has threads that stand proud of the shaft, then it may be necessary to drill two different-sized holes: the base piece receives a hole determined by the size of the shaft (softer woods may receive a slightly smaller pilot than harder woods); the piece being attached requires a hole that will allow the threads to pass through easily, so that the ...


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