6

In my limited experience, I'd say that anything over a difference of 0.01"+ is getting to be 'loose'. The pieces tenon should be able to be inserted into the mortise by hand, that is to say does not need to be hammered in. But it should have enough friction that it does when dry fitting that the tenon piece does not fall out of the tenon. If it is looser ...


6

all epoxies are food safe once fully cured This may be an overstatement. Food-safe epoxies do exist. In order to be considered "food-safe," the ingredients need to meet FDA CFR 175.105 & 175.300 (in the United States, at least). McMaster-Carr has some for sale. Permabond makes some. West Systems, another well-known epoxy maker, specifically states ...


5

Check out this page: http://woodgears.ca/mortise/accuracy.html He suggests that about .001 (one thou) under for the tenons is perfect, while .005 is too loose.


5

Could I fill them with a glue/sawdust mixture? You can yes but common woodworking glue (PVA-type, white or yellow) wouldn't necessarily be the best choice for the glue. A much more solid fill can be made by using epoxy. Filled (or just coloured) epoxy is now a common material for filling voids and defects in wood. To a degree this kind of filler can ...


4

Personally I'm of the belief that epoxies are safe for direct food contact (once fully cured) without specific information to the contrary, based on basic principles. That's not to say I would use any old epoxy as a surfacing for something like a drinking vessel, but I'd be perfectly happy with virtually any commercial wood finish for incidental food contact....


3

In the absence of helpful comments, I've done some research on PVA glue chemistry to see what this could be. The general rule of thumb is that wood glue does not stick to cured wood glue. Wood glue binding undergoes two phases. A short-term drying phase (< 2 hr), during which the material is simply dehydrated. A curing phase (24 h+), in which ...


2

I would create an apron frame attached to the bottom of the butcher block. This way you can maintain the solid butcher block look, and it will greatly simplify the construction. Offsetting the apron frame prevents the difficulty of having to line up with the top, as well as opening up the possibility of using a different material altogether. If you are ...


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