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I want to add a 'hard wax oil' on my kitchen table. However I have finished it with a three coats of linseed oil. (once 1:1 turpentine and linseed and 2 coats of pure linseed oil).

Is it possible to give the table a 4th coat of a 'hard wax oil' on top?

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In general there's no problem with adding a different oil-based finish on top of wood that was previously oiled. And despite widespread belief that this is necessary you don't have to allow the oil in the wood to 'dry' (cure) first, the two finishes should effectively meld together just as they would to a previous coat of the same finish.

You may find it beneficial to gently scuff or lightly sand before applying the "hard wax oil" but it may work perfectly well applied directly to the surface you already have.

Caveat emptor
If you're seeking superior waterproofing than linseed oil provides by itself I would strongly recommend doing a test of some kind to check just what level of protection the other finish will actually provide. Consumer usage reports and independent testing have begun to show that manufacturer claims for the robustness and water-resistance of "hard wax oil" products can a little 'generous' (read: exaggerated) compared to previously established finishes on the market, chief among them being plain old varnish.

  • Thank you for your clarification. I am still learning about all of this. I just got a hard wax oil. I will give it a try. Some further notes. Yesterday I had a little mishap: my linseed oil surface was exposed to a little water drops just after two days drying. It left some rough spots. am I correct to assume that lightly sanding, washing the table with water and little soap waiting 24h and then using the oilwax is a good course of action. – A.Dumas Dec 11 '18 at 9:02
  • Just lightly scuff those areas and then buff with a cloth to restore the surface quality. If you wipe the table down damp at this stage that may raise the grain of the entire surface! This is a step often done deliberately (and sometimes repeated, 2, 3 times), but during prep, not after finishing has begun. – Graphus Dec 12 '18 at 8:06

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