I am wondering if it would be possible to dye black gorilla glue and use it to fill cracks in wood instead of the well known black epoxy method?

Why? Because finding right epoxy and dealing with it is much harder than glue.

Concerns: - what dye to use inside the glue to avoid colouring the rest of wood when sanding or waxing it - can gorilla glue sanding give decent results for small surfaces? like continuous matte surface?

- risks of affecting how coloured wax would stain the wood, if glue is black darkening the wood should avoid a high-contrast

  • If you have a look at some of the previous Answers that talk about epoxy fills here you'll see that you don't need a specialised epoxy for this kind of job, if you can get any inexpensive epoxy adhesives they can be used for this purpose and appear to hold up well. The epoxy I use most as an adhesive and for filling is currently €1.50. Your equivalent will be found in Poundland or another similar shop. Generally the working time is only about 3-5 minutes so you can't easily tackle large fills, but this is long enough to be able to do most cracks, nail holes and other smaller defects. – Graphus Aug 5 at 12:31
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I am wondering if it would be possible to dye black gorilla glue and use it to fill cracks in wood instead of the well known black epoxy method?

No. Polyurethane glues foam up as they cure, and the foam isn't particularly strong. If you try to use it to fill cracks, you won't get the hard, solid surface that you get with epoxy, but instead a crappy, brittle foam.

Because finding right epoxy and dealing with it is much harder than glue.

At least here in the US, suitable two-part epoxies are readily available in any hardware store or home center. I don't know if that's the case in the UK, but Amazon and other online suppliers also offer many options. Aside from the 10 seconds that mixing the parts requires, I don't think there's any real difference in effort required to use epoxy compared to glue.

can gorilla glue sanding give decent results for small surfaces? like continuous matte surface?

Try it. Just fill a crack with plain, un-dyed Gorilla Glue as a simple test. I don't think you'll like the results. As I said above, you're not going to get a solid surface because the glue will foam up as it reacts with moisture in the air.

Gorilla Glue is great stuff -- it's extremely strong, and it works well for outdoor applications where it resists moisture and UV light very well. It's just not good at filling gaps the way epoxy does.

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