1
Here are the tools that I am using to align my blade to the miter slots:  
1) Neoteck DTI Digtial Dial NTK012 indicates 0.01mm/0.0005"  
2) Neoteck Digital Level NTK034 Box   
     (Resolution: ±0.01 Degrees at 0-1 and 89-90 Degrees; ±0.05 Degrees at the Rest  
      Accuracy: ±0.1 Degrees at 0-1 and 89-90 Degrees; ±0.02 Degrees at the Rest)   
3) Digital angle finder  https://www.generaltools.com/5-in-digital-angle-finder    
      Accuracy: ±0.3°  
      Resolution: 0.1°

When I test #2 against the 90 degrees of a carpenter square is dead on !
The digital level is not that stable and I am thinking about returning it

My question is: what is an acceptable deviation from 90 for a table saw like Rigid TS3650? (blade raised at 3" above the table level and it should be as square as possible to the table top)

I guess it will depend on the task so here are my near future plans:
-picture frames
-kitchen island frames
-shelves
-bathroom vanities

At full blade height I get a 44.8 for 45 degrees and 89.6 at 90 degrees measured with tool #3 The above mean that I can't push the blade any more toward any of the extreme angles

  • In the last paragraph did you mean 99.6 degrees or 90.6 degrees? – Ashlar Apr 5 '18 at 15:24
  • 89.6..sorry for the typo, I corrected that – MiniMe Apr 5 '18 at 15:57
  • Did you mean that #3 is dead on? #2 is the level that you intend to return. – Ast Pace Apr 5 '18 at 20:45
  • yes #3 works fantastic. I managed to get 90degrees sharp and 44.9 after learning that my saw had two stops that adjust and control how far the blade can tilt!! I was using an old manual! – MiniMe Apr 5 '18 at 23:00
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To be honest, the acceptable tolerance is whatever causes there to be no problems with whatever specific job you're working on. As you indicate, for some jobs you're going to need a tighter tolerance than others. It's not something anyone else can really answer, since the answer really can only be "It has to be good enough". I would suggest measuring the angle on the cut piece as well as just the blade itself as the result is what actually matters.

For reference I've always just set it up with an engineer's square (no digital angle finders etc.) and this has always been good enough for my purposes.

Also to consider is that the smaller the protrusion of the blade from the bed is, the less the angle alignment of the blade will matter.

  • I guess that is why they ask you to raise the blade 3" above the bed... that would be a reasonable cut depth for most of the jobs that require precision. What are you needs. I came across an article or post on a forum where the author was saying that he has standard tolerances for each type of job (ex: 1/64 for cabinets -otherwise doors won't close !?) – MiniMe Apr 5 '18 at 11:49
  • @MiniMe FYI 1/64" (0.016") would be considered completely unacceptable tolerances for many (perhaps most) cabinetmakers for joints and lots of components. They'd typically want to be under 0.1mm, which is about 0.004", or better than four times better than a 64th! – Graphus Apr 5 '18 at 15:04
  • At full blade height I get a 44.8 for 45 degrees and 99.6 at 90 degrees with tool #3 The above mean that I can't push the blade any more toward any of the extreme angles. Is that acceptable? – MiniMe Apr 5 '18 at 15:16
  • above it is 89.6 not 99.6 – MiniMe Apr 5 '18 at 15:58

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