3

How do I divide a 1x6 equally to make two 45 degree edge French cleats?

5

Answers above are correct, but if your OCD is firing up, set the 45 degree blade to rip a smaller chunk closer to the fence (say, 2.5"), then run the offcut through the saw again at that same fence setting. Easier than math, and accounts for multiple slightly different width boards.

| improve this answer | |
  • Even if you do the geometry of the other answers, your two pieces are going to be at least slightly different in width and you will have resort to employing the concept of this answer, i.e. you need to make to rips. – Ast Pace Aug 13 '17 at 5:43
3

You don't have to divide the board equally to make workable French cleats.

If you need to do multiples that match just pick a fence position that approximately divides the boards you're starting with, write down that setting so you don't forget it, then rip each subsequent one the same as the first. Attach the same wider or narrower piece to the wall each time.

| improve this answer | |
1

A 1 x 6 will be 3/4" thick. A 45° cut will have an offset of 3/4" for placement. Half of that is 3/8", which will provide for the duplication you seek. Locate the midpoint of the board, move the line by that amount and make your cut. Obviously, you'll want to ensure that your angle is tilted the correct direction. In this case, it's measure twice but also check your triangles, then cut once.

cleat cut

Not to scale, but pretty darn close. The saw blade should be centered on the line in order to balance the kerf material reduction for both sides.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Does this account for kerf? – Matt Aug 12 '17 at 16:29
  • you can account for kerf by centering your cut on the line. Half of the kerf is eaten up by one side, the other half by the other side of the board. – fred_dot_u Aug 12 '17 at 21:21
  • 1
    I would add that into the question so the OP is awate – Matt Aug 12 '17 at 21:40
  • 1
    If your stock isn't exactly 3/4" you can set a dividers to half the thickness then use that as the offset from the center line. – SaSSafraS1232 Aug 14 '17 at 22:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.