1

I have an outdoor teak table that I want to be protected against the weather without altering the way it looks too much. I put clear spar urethane on my chairs and was unhappy because they ended up with a wet look and a different color (they were ash wood). How can I prevent this for my table?

  • 1
    It may not be possible to get exactly what you'd like here. The two desires are in conflict since most finishes will change the look of the wood. The usual answer to this for indoor stuff isn't applicable here, partly due to the teak, partly due to this being an exterior application. But, because it's teak there leaving it unfinished is a solid option. Teak is regularly left unfinished in a marine environment so if it can take that it can take what your local weather will throw at it. It will weather and silver, but you can still expect a long service life, – Graphus May 15 '17 at 7:24
  • 1
    this is one of the holy grails of finishing btw. – aaron May 15 '17 at 17:02
1

Teak is commonly used on boats and usually finished with either varnish or "teak oil". The oil need more regular maintenance than a varnish but this is easier than refinishing a varnished finish. The oil will offer a more natural finish, not appearing as a layer on top of the wood as will varnish. You might try bit on a scrap to see if it satisfies.

  • If anyone wants to make their own version of "teak oil" it's not dissimilar to "Danish oil" in being a blend of oil and varnish heavily thinned with spirits. So get an exterior varnish and some tung oil or linseed oil, mix them together and add an equal volume (or more) of spirits and you'll have something identical to many commercial versions of "teak oil". – Graphus May 16 '17 at 8:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.