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I participate and organize within a makerspace. Though I read up on woodworking and have some familiarity, I don't always remember details myself as woodworking isn't my main focus. This seems to be an issue for other members of our space too.

One of our top problems is people using the wrong blade type for the wrong cutting action due to lack of experience and taking a best guess or thinking they know when they have misremembered. (such as rip-cut blades vs cross-cut blades)

I would like to have reference materials to hang on the wall as a quick guide to remind people of different types of blades, show what they look like, and their various uses.

Is there a collection or resource for some good graphical guides or signs that can be hung up as a quick reference for types of saw blades?

Do people have such graphics they can post here?

marked as duplicate by Jason C, rob Mar 9 '16 at 3:50

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    This is on the edge of being a "shopping question"... Blade manufacturers often have advertising material showing their product lines; try contacting them. – keshlam Feb 24 '16 at 6:01
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    One way you could teach them is to explain why the blades are the shape they are. Then, given the material they have to cut, they can look at any arbitrary blade and make the appropriate judgment instead of the limited selection they memorized. You could also just write the type on the blade. – Jason C Feb 26 '16 at 7:23
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    I brought this up in a meta question: meta.woodworking.stackexchange.com/questions/319/…. I think this is off topic but I think we could reword into a good question. Please don't feel pressured to change anything yet. It is just a discussion. – Matt Feb 26 '16 at 18:59
  • @Jason - I don't know that I actually know that myself - though I have read it some. I agree that would put it into a body of understand rather than a pure memory aspect. – NipFu Feb 26 '16 at 19:02
  • @NipFu Start here. E.g. rockler.com/how-to/blades-101. Make it required reading. Then cut something. See also fix.com/assets/content/15509/table-saw-blade-basics.png, popularwoodworking.com/techniques/joinery/band_saw_tool_school, and whatever else looks interesting on that first page of results. Try cuts with different blades, observe the results. Imagine the teeth cutting through the material. Imagine extremes (e.g. high TPI imagine cutting with sandpaper; low TPI imagine 1 tooth). – Jason C Feb 26 '16 at 19:07
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For bandsaws I just use this page from the MSC catalog, it is basically just a chart of thickness and TPI. There are also a bunch of other useful product guides in that catalog, like for drills and stuff. I'm sure other vendors or supply companies have their versions of this too.

https://www.mscdirect.com/FlyerView?pagelabel=1600&search=03166220&contentPath=/sales-catalogs/big-book

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I found the below for circular saws blades. Nothing for band saws yet.

enter image description here

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    A link to a full-sized image would be useful for future readers of this answer (usefulness to other future readers is what this site is mainly about). Attribution and/or a note about copyright might be worth including. – RedGrittyBrick Feb 24 '16 at 10:04
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    Also, you may want to convert that image to grayscale. Given the presumed difficulty the people have remembering blade types based on your description, you don't want them to associate certain colors with certain types by accident. – Jason C Feb 26 '16 at 7:27
  • ok. i will improve this when i get the chance. – NipFu Feb 26 '16 at 19:00

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