2

I have purchased an epoxy table. The design was very unique, but the guy who sold it said its not highest quality, so it was discounted.

It consists of many pieces of wood covered in epoxy with some pieces exposed on the surface. One of them started cracking. What is the best way to fix it?

enter image description here

enter image description here

1
  • Hi, welcome to StackExchange. Sorry to tell you but the short answer is you can't really expect to be able to repair this if you're not experienced in woodworking and/or working with epoxy. Tables like these are inherently a bad design and not destined to last in good condition :-( Hope you didn't pay too much for it.
    – Graphus
    Mar 7, 2023 at 4:07

1 Answer 1

5

But some pieces are exposed. One of them started cracking.

Trying to fix this will probably only make the problem worse.

It looks like the crack is at the edge of one exposed piece that has shrunk. That's pretty typical for wood: it expands a little bit when the average humidity is high, and shrinks when it's low. If you fill the crack with more epoxy (or anything else), that same piece of wood won't have the space to expand again in the future when the humidity increases. Even though the change in the wood is small, it can exert tremendous force and might well cause a larger crack in the epoxy that would be impossible to repair.

In order to try to fix this, you'd need to seal the wood off from the environment so that it'll stop changing seasonally. You might be able to use a router with a template to remove the top surface of the exposed piece, creating a recess. Then you could mix and pour new epoxy into the recess, up to the surface of the table. You'd then need to scrape or sand the surface flush, and then try to polish the surface to get the repair to blend in. Doing that well seems like a difficult job even for someone skilled in working with epoxy, and probably not really feasible without the right knowledge and equipment.

5
  • 1
    Thank you! I will monitor it and see if it expands with time due to humidity or temperature changes Mar 7, 2023 at 17:20
  • 3
    Well I'll upvote even if the OP forgot to. One of my major worries with this would not be that this piece shrank as part of the yearly cycle of MC change, but instead that it wasn't fully dried to begin with. Regardless of the exact type of shrinkage, I'm wondering how this could even shrink, maybe it's due to thinning from the large roundover (in which case so many other potential problem areas around the periphery) but what about the bottom??
    – Graphus
    Mar 7, 2023 at 19:43
  • 1
    Thanks @Graphus. I think the issue is that the piece with the crack was exposed; from the question, some pieces are exposed.
    – Caleb
    Mar 7, 2023 at 23:08
  • 3
    @Caleb, ah, I totally spaced on that! As the saying goes, "there's your problem right there".
    – Graphus
    Mar 8, 2023 at 6:32
  • 1
    @NikitaNikolajev please take the tour to learn the proper way to say "thank you" around here.
    – FreeMan
    Mar 10, 2023 at 16:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.