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It's normally never below freezing where I live so I never bother bringing glue inside. There was a cold snap around -7c nights for 3-4 days and I have 5 different unopened epoxy tubes that were inside an unheated van. I work on furniture for customers so risking it is not worth it for 50-60$. Would you recommend replacing them?

Thank you.

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  • "...risking it is not worth it for 50-60$" Right?
    – gnicko
    Mar 14 at 0:37
  • @gnicko, I totally agree with the principle but it doesn't apply here. First and foremost, epoxies aren't sensitive to freezing. But even adhesives (and other products, including many paints) that should not be frozen can survive a single freezing event — as a rule many things that have "Do Not Freeze" admonitions on the labelling are now manufactured to survive at least a couple of freeze/thaw cycles because of the realities of shipping and storage during winter..... barely insulated trucks and unheated storage facilities are not at all uncommon somewhere along supply chains.
    – Graphus
    Mar 14 at 13:28
  • @Graphus Undoubtedly. I wouldn't sweat it myself, but if OP is that unsure of it, just buy new. In this day and age do what you can to eliminate stress....
    – gnicko
    Mar 14 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

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Should be fine. Epoxy contains no water, so is not damaged by freezing.

Some users rely on this when they mix a large batch, putting one half in the freezer so they can use it later! I have done this with epoxy adhesives and putties with no harm to final product.

If you doubt you can test it. If liquids look normal, it hardens in usual time and you cannot separate pieces without wood itself splitting your epoxy is good. If your resin has become cloudy you can restore it by heating, see link.

"First of all, do not despair, frozen epoxy isn't ruined! Although both your resin and activator are capable of freezing, it's very easy to return them to a usable liquid state."

From WiseBond blog, What Happens If My Epoxy Freezes During Delivery?

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  • 1
    This. Epoxies survive sub-zero temps just fine.
    – Graphus
    Mar 14 at 13:20
  • 1
    Occassionally doing a test piece from the left-over glue is always a good idea, to identify problems early.
    – jpa
    Mar 14 at 15:25
  • @jpa, yup. Doesn't everyone leave a small puddle of epoxy on the mixing surface/inside the cup to check setting progress? :-)
    – Graphus
    Mar 14 at 19:46
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I work on furniture for customers so risking it is not worth it for 50-60$. Would you recommend replacing them?

It seems like the essential issue here is that you don't feel confident that low temperatures won't affect the material. I'm sure you wouldn't ask about a box of nails left in your truck in freezing temperatures because everybody knows that freezing won't affect nails at all.

Instead of just replacing the epoxy because you aren't sure, I think you'd be better off getting the information you need to know whether freezing might have any adverse effect on either part of the epoxy. I hate to say "go look it up," but that really is the best approach -- every brand of epoxy I've used has a FAQ somewhere on the manufacturer's web site that answers questions about storage, working temperature, etc. Go find the answers for the specific product you're using, and then you'll know whether there's any risk of decreased effectiveness at all after freezing. Here's an article for West System epoxy.

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  • And, if you can't find the info, pretty much every site has a "contact us" link. Send them a nice email, explain the situation, include the exact product name/number (send them the UPC number - they'll ID it from that!) and ask.
    – FreeMan
    Mar 22 at 18:20

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