1

On my new table I am making I forgot to put lacquer on to stop the epoxy from soaking in, can I go back and add the lacquer then add the epoxy?

2
  • 1
    Hi, welcome to StackExchange. If epoxy has already soaked in there's no unringing that bell — generally things like this need to be done in one, and only one, order. But I think we're going to need to see a photo or two to be sure. You can edit the Q at any time to add pictures into it.
    – Graphus
    Sep 26 at 0:15
  • Four days since you posted Brian, please let us know if you have abandoned the Question. If you haven't please add more details about what you're doing (and preferably some photos) so we can better help you.
    – Graphus
    Sep 29 at 7:53
1

A layer of cured epoxy will stop epoxy from soaking into the wood at least as well as lacquer will. Skip the lacquer and just do another layer of epoxy.

5
  • While this is of course true I don't think we know enough yet to provide a useful Answer here. There are multiple possibly relevant details that could be important, including at the most basic the much higher cost of epoxy versus lacquer. Also the poor ageing of epoxy with UV exposure may become an issue. Additionally there's the chance of tide marks should fresh epoxy be applied to a surface that has already got some on it (an issue I've seen firsthand multiple times).
    – Graphus
    Sep 27 at 8:42
  • @Graphus The to stop the epoxy from soaking in ship has sailed. At this point, a coat of lacquer to seal the wood isn’t necessary. If OP has more questions, they should a) research and then b) ask a more detailed question if still stuck.
    – Caleb
    Sep 27 at 13:07
  • Yes that ship has sailed, as I referred to in my Comment. And yes, this seems to suggest the original need for the lacquer coat is no longer there. But we don't know where epoxy has been absorbed, how it relates to the finished product (e.g. visible on show surfaces?) etc. Given the Q does refer to adding "the epoxy" it suggests that more, possibly all, is yet to be added (a fill? a river?) and this is directly relevant to suggested courses of action. I'm thinking for example that there's a chance planing/power sanding back and then going ahead as originally planned might be the right call....
    – Graphus
    Sep 27 at 16:46
  • @Graphus I'm not sure what your beef is here. I'm trying to help the OP with the question they posed, not solve every aspect of all the problems they might encounter.
    – Caleb
    Sep 27 at 17:09
  • You're a Stack Overflow user, I presume of very long standing given your user score, I shouldn't have to explain this to you :-| I have no beef, the fact is we're specifically instructed not to answer bad questions! There are two close votes on the Q precisely because it isn't.
    – Graphus
    Sep 27 at 21:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.