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I am in the process of building a second floor to our container home which includes the mindless task of screwing thousands of screws into sheets of OSB.

So far I have only used drill holsters or pouches that attach to your belt or the ones that come with a belt like contraption. Drill Holster

I find them both very inconvenient in terms of carrying and picking up the screwdriver quickly and they keep pulling on my pants.

I would love to have something similar to a camera strap like these ones: Professional Quick Action Camera Shoulder Strap with Quick Release Clip​​

That allow me to:

  • quickly switch between adjusting the OSB board and screwing in the screws
  • lift the screwdriver above my head without it being constrained by the contraption
  • doesn’t restrain my movement too much and doesn’t dangle around uncontrollably
  • cherry on top if it has something to attach one or more bags for the screws

Does anyone know if such a thing exists and what it's called?

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    Interesting idea... I suspect you'll have to home-brew it, though. A couple of alternatives: a lightweight impact driver with a belt clip can hook onto your trousers (pocket or waistband) without dragging them down too badly. Or, go to a full workbelt with suspenders and put something like the linked holster on that belt. It'll also have plenty of room in the pouches for screws. Jul 20 at 14:17
  • Hi Stefanie, welcome to Woodworking! First off be aware that direct shopping queries are off-topic for this SE so technically we can't Answer this, but we always try to help. I think your included photo pretty much gives you the solution that could work, and well enough that you don't need to overthink it and try to come up with a better solution given your limited actual need (see next comment): a standard camera strap, one karabiner + a couple of cable ties to give you something to clip to and there you go.
    – Graphus
    Jul 20 at 15:16
  • Now I don't want this to come across as dismissive which is why I put this second, my first thought was how about the tried-and-trusted technique of putting the driver down on a nearby surface and picking it up when you need it? Like so many things in construction and woodworking the way to get through it may be to make a mental adjustment; just put your head down and get to it. Might help to remember that it wasn't too long ago that every one of those — not thousands ;-) — of screws would have been driven in manually, and if they needed to pre-drill holes they were done by hand too!
    – Graphus
    Jul 20 at 15:20
  • Once I answered this one it occurs to me this might be a better fit for DIY SE. Maybe move this there? Or the OP can search there first anyway.
    – jdv
    Jul 20 at 17:31
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    Thanks, yes it's still a high priority for me. I think my use case - someone working by themselves with not much upper body strength - might not be the usual one, but still relevant to some when installing ceilings and walls. I already have some equipment to diy a solution and I am happy to share that as an additional Q+A on the DIY site. I think the post might be interesting to others with my use case, even if such a thing does not exist yet.
    – Steffi
    Jul 27 at 9:03
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Makita drills (and I'm sure others do as well) come with an optional hanger so you can safely hang it upside-down when you are up on a ladder. It is intended to slip into a belt (not the fancy holster you show) but it'll go anywhere that hook can conveniently fit.

When I was in the trades those up on the ladders would rig up a receiver for that hook on the ladder itself. If you can find a way to hang such an awkward mass safely using a home-brew harness you can try that. I've never seen any after-market harness -- we'd just wear a minimal pouch-and-belt and hook the drill into that or hang it from the ladder. Some guys even had a lanyard attached to it so they didn't drop their precious tool (or brain their less-precious co-workers).

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    Yup, some of my DeWalt cordless tools come with belt clips. I find it so useful, I bought a package and applied them to about every other tool that would take one. (The circular saw? Not so much...)
    – FreeMan
    Jul 26 at 13:24

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