3

I recently bought and set up my first ever bandsaw, a Laguna 14/12. While I understand that bandsaws make rougher cuts than, say, a table saw, my new saw is leaving quite a rough surface given the fineness of the blade I’m using.

Here’s what I’ve done so far:

  • bought a third party blade (13mm wide, with 4tpi)
  • tensioned the blade so that it deflects about 5mm when I press it
  • tracked the blade so that the teeth are nearly centered on the tires, based on advice from the internet
  • set up the blade and the guides to the best of my ability, such that they are very close but not touching

Here are some test rips I did, in walnut and construction pine.

walnut construction pine

Is the problem likely the choice of blade or setup? Or is this normal for a brand new bandsaw/blade?

8
  • "given the fineness of the blade" What do you mean by fineness here?
    – Graphus
    May 15 at 19:30
  • Did you find your answer elsewhere?
    – Graphus
    May 17 at 18:59
  • I am by no means a band saw expert, but 4 TPI doesn't seem like a particularly fine pitch blade to me.
    – FreeMan
    May 18 at 18:04
  • 1
    Thanks, that’s helpful! Maybe I was overthinking it.
    – colinmarc
    May 19 at 16:22
  • 1
    Welcome! That was going to be the gist of the Answer I had planned to write — that these are perhaps about as good as you could typically expect. I should mention from what I've heard (no direct experience) you can get blades that do better, but regardless no bandsaw cut should ever be used as-is except for rough work. And as mentioned it should be very quick to dress the surface to smooth and dead flat (30 seconds with hand plane, two passes through a planer or over a jointer, or however much power sanding would do the approximate equivalent).
    – Graphus
    May 20 at 7:56
7

A couple of thoughts:

  1. bandsaws do not cut clean like table saws. If you google for images of band sawed wood there is a texture from the cut.

  2. Assuming correct tension (which also helps clean cuts), ensure the guide blocks' setups, top and bottom, match and are correct. If they are wayout you will hear a pulsing sound to the cut.

Shorten the opening of the cutting clearance as much as possible.

These two adjustments will minimize the side-to-side motion which leads to the rough repeating texture you are seeing.

  1. Sometimes the weld on the saw blade may be a little off and that will cause the blade to have a slight wobble or skip. If you turn off the saw and rotate the blade until you see the weld mark, you can feel the difference, if any, with your fingers. If so, replace the blade.

  2. While there isn't space here for all the details, there are a great range of blade thicknesses, and teeth shapes and spacings. Loosely speaking a thick deep blade with more teeth leaves a smoother finish, but I'm grossly simplifying.

  3. Adjust your feed speed! Generally, a slower feed speed equals a smooth cut. This is the easiest adjustment on the list!

I assume the wood to be cut is held with enough downward pressure to avoid extra movement that cutting may introduce. If the lumber is bouncing around, none of the above will help that much.

2
  • I also assume the wood to be cut is held with enough downward pressure to avoid extra movement that cutting may introduce. If the lumber is bouncing around, none of the above will help that much. ;)
    – ewm
    May 17 at 18:07
  • 3
    You can edit the Answer and drop that nugget in there. SE does not "consider comments part of the answer" because they are ephemeral to some degree.
    – jdv
    May 17 at 21:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.