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I'm working on a design for my own plow/rabbet plane with a steel skate, because I like a challenge. The fence will be wood. The skate and fence will slide on a pair of steel rods (which I can order on ebay), but I need some sort of steel through-hole fastener, ideally one that is tightenable. What should I use for this purpose?

For example, the Veritas plough plane has these fasteners:

veritas fasteners

The "arms" tighten when the brass thumb screw goes onto the threads. In the Veritas case, the "through-hole" part is probably covered by a machined hole in the steel fence itself. In my case, I need a metal fastener with an unthreaded hole which I can epoxy into the wooden fence, checking for square before the glue sets. Ideally, it would also have a small threaded hole on the top for a thumb screw (for locking the rod into place). I could also drill that myself.

I'm also happy for suggestions on other ways to do this.

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  • "I'm also happy for suggestions on other ways to do this." You're trying to match this feature on a high-tech, machine-made plough on a handmade item.... uh, why don't you instead look at how wooden planes (including many made by their users) locked the fence in the approximately two centuries before Leonard Lee was born? ^_^
    – Graphus
    Mar 25 at 15:31
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The Veritas plane uses a sort of split collar that gives the friction fit you want. There are plenty of designs for that out there. You just need to figure out how to attach them solidly to the base. (I'd recommend learning how to braze.)

My Stanley No. 45 uses a thumbscrew through the collar. Sort of a grub screw, but instead of a slot or hex head it offers a way to snug it with your fingers.

Check out the usual suspects like McMaster-Carr for "split collars". Or make your own (or find a local metalworking who can assist).

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    shaft collar seems like the right thing to search for. It's always about finding the right keyword!
    – colinmarc
    Mar 25 at 13:31

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