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I have a bunch of 9' long by 6" 4/4 rough sawn (flat sawn) white oak in my garage. I'm curious as to whether I should expect it to cup and/or bow over time. It's kiln dried. I have it in stacks, 11 pieces high, on some 2 x 2 yellow pine every 14 inches or so to keep it off the floor. I live in a relatively humid climate. Should I expect that this lumber will change much over time? I don't plan on using it for the better part of a year. Is there anything besides what I've mentioned that I should do to keep it more stable?

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    Yes I was checking if you knew about the centre board being QS and the two adjacent ones being essentially RS, and how you might want to selectively use this wood for its lower movement rate and/or the figure. – Graphus Mar 6 at 3:21
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    @Graphus Oh I see, thank you so much for looking out. I am hoping to find a couple quartersawn pieces with some nice ray fleck. I'm planning to use the old steel wool staining technique to darken the wood in a neutral way without changing the hue much. I think some QS boards could look really cool this way. – orokusaki Mar 6 at 3:24
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    @Graphus Thanks. I actually watched the video with Ben. That was great. I just was having a hard time trying to imagine how I could possibly fume such large quantities of wood. I was thinking of making a slightly diluted solution of this vinegar steel wool and experimenting with pieces of the wood first, but I hadn't really thought about how different one board might be compared to the next, but I can totally imagine my project turning out to be some kind of hodgepodge of various shades, that's a really good point. It'll be sometime before I even get there, but I really appreciate this advice. – orokusaki Mar 6 at 4:04
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    "having a hard time trying to imagine how I could possibly fume such large quantities" Don't do it all, do your project pieces after they're completed (you may have to do it this way anyway, but also it is the norm for this technique) and if necessary in batches depending on the size of the fume tent you can organise. In fact it wasn't (isn't?) unusual for the complete furniture piece to be fumed, fully assembled, in case you didn't know. – Graphus Mar 6 at 10:29
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    "a slightly diluted solution of this vinegar steel wool and experimenting with pieces of the wood first" Well do that anyway, good to view the colours you'll get with your own eyes and also you need to try various finishes over the stained surface to see how much they deepen the colour and/or change the hue. FWIW the best brown tones I've seen created with vinegar were on beech. Very strong tea was used on the wood as well, to strengthen and even out the colour. This achieved a deep chocolate brown after finishing, which if memory serves was done by oiling followed by button polish. – Graphus Mar 6 at 10:32

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