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I want to make a dining table with no aprons ("mid century modern" style), out of oak planks (first time doing tables, and something this large in general). Basically I want to copy this one: enter image description herehttps://homestock.nl/shop/meubels/tafels/eettafels/eettafel-camille/. In the shop I didn't take pictures, but I recall that in the border of the table (20cm maybe), there was a second layer of planks glued, so it seems thicker on the outer side (you can see it zooming the pics), but most of the table is rather thin (2cm, while they claim is 4cm). Also, they added a couple of C-section iron beams. This makes the table lighter, and I guess also cheaper.

So, the question is, can I safely reproduce this table top with no danger of sagging? The legs of the table are quite in the extreme of the table, and the lack of aprons is a bit intimidating in this regard. More in general, is there a reference for how thick a table should be, like some result from beam theory?

Dimensions are 90 x 220 cm (aprox 35 x 85 inches).

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    Your best reference for this is the "sagulator": woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator Nov 10, 2020 at 18:40
  • That link will be gone in an internet moment. You should provide a basic sketch showing these details that are clear to you, but may not be obvious to anyone reading the description.
    – user5572
    Nov 11, 2020 at 0:57
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    Hi, welcome to Woodworking. Just to be clear, you want to glue some (3?) oak planks together for this tabletop? If so, and assuming you joint the edges well and glue them properly, that will be absolutely fine. You wouldn't believe how stiff thick, solid hardwood like oak is and it is stiffness that resists sag. Your table won't have any tendency to sag with any normal use, and (the top) would in fact be able to take significant weight right in the centre without noticeably bowing. The attachments for the legs should therefore be your main focus [contd]
    – Graphus
    Nov 11, 2020 at 6:55
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    ...if you're not intending to use one or other of the commercial hardware options you must carefully plan how this should be done for good strength, since splayed legs naturally want to splay more as load is applied. You might be tempted to just think this through and come up with a solution, and you might come up with a good one, but there's no need since numerous people have trodden the same path before you. So, as I usually recommend, save yourself the bother and don't reinvent the wheel — just look up how others have done this and copy someone.
    – Graphus
    Nov 11, 2020 at 7:01
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    Just curious, are you able to turn the legs yourself or was the plan to purchase them? Not sure how easy it would be to buy matching oak legs (assuming you need them to match of course). BTW just to mention, if you don't own a lathe there are various other ways of achieving round starting with square stock, including router and TS sleds, but doing it completely by hand is not actually especially difficult, just time consuming (using some combo of spokeshave, hand plane and scraping or sanding).
    – Graphus
    Nov 13, 2020 at 9:03

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