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Forgive me if I'm missing something but I do not see why you should have to fully submerge the wood to reach maximum penetration of the resin.

As far as I can tell, when in a vacuum chamber, air is pulled from between the structure in the wood and is replaced with the resin and that's great. However, if the wood was left floating in the resin (say half way) surely the vacuum would work more efficiently at removing the air in the part of the wood currently not surrounded by liquid. If this was the case, would the capillary action of the wood not draw the liquid into the centre of the wood more effectively?

Surely, if submerged in resin, once the first few millimeters of wood is saturated, it would take a greater force to remove the remaining air out from the deepest part of the wood as it would need to be pulled through the rest of the liquid whicg is exerting a greater pressure on the remaining air. My though is that if the wood was simply floating in the resin when the vacuum is initiated, once the piece below the liquid is saturated, the capiliarry action of the wood would draw the liquid up the rest of the wood more evenly.

Either way I will definitely be testing my thoughts on a piece of wood shortly but I would be interested to hear your thoughts.

Cheers 😊

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    It's unclear what your question is here. – jdv Jun 8 at 2:58
  • "However, if the wood was left floating in the resin (say half way) surely the vacuum would work more efficiently at removing the air in the part of the wood currently not surrounded by liquid. If this was the case, would the capillary action of the wood not draw the liquid into the centre of the wood" Wood's structure is not homogenous and omnidirectional. In other words it's not like a sponge, more like a bundle of straws. These straws are basically not connected sideways. From this you might see why it's normal to make sure the wood is in fact submerged, so resin can touch the open ends. – Graphus Jun 8 at 8:09
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    "...but I would be interested to hear your thoughts." StackExchange isn't really set up for this kind of open-ended invitation, this is a formal Q&A venue and as such needs an actual query that can be answered. If you want to get into a discourse on this it would be best to post on one of the woodworking forums. Sawmill Creek and the Reddit woodworking subreddit are probably the busiest in North America, with the largest groups of active, posting, members. – Graphus Jun 8 at 8:11
  • Cactus Juice? What am I missing? – Greg Nickoloff Jun 18 at 18:22

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