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Reading the original post and your later comments, I think your best bet here would be to buy a spade bit specifically for this job and then modify it to suit your preferences.

This takes advantage of one of the key advantages of spade bits: their low cost. And this is even if you had to buy new, but rusty old ones are also very easy to find secondhand at yard sales, car-boot sales, in thrift stores or charity shops, in boxes of miscellaneous old tools or junk. Going by the usual prices for rusty old bits and bobs I'd doubt you'd have to pay more than a buck for one; I've gotten old auger bits for less.

Even without modification a spade bit of the right diameter I think would be fine as I presume the central hole wouldn't be visible after the rubber feet are in place. But since most spade bits are made of carbon steel they're easy to reshape by file if needed; even if made of HSS a grinder would make short work of the needed modifications (and there would be no worries there about overheating it during grinding).

Either way you could literally be done in five minutes after you got the bit home, well before ironing out the design of a router template, much less starting work on building it.

Two possible spade bit modifications:

Spade bit mods

The one on the left would leave a small depression in the centre, approximately the size that some Forstner bits create.

If this is not acceptable you could do the mod on the right, which will leave just a tiny pip of wood in the centre of the hole that would need to be pared off with a chisel. The reason I don't suggest this as the first thing to try is that without a central spur it will be much harder to accurately position a drill bit on a marked spot.

Reading the original post and your later comments, I think your best bet here would be to buy a spade bit specifically for this job and then modify it to suit your preferences.

This takes advantage of one of the key advantages of spade bits: their low cost. And this is even if you had to buy new, but rusty old ones are also very easy to find secondhand at yard sales, car-boot sales, in thrift stores or charity shops, in boxes of miscellaneous old tools or junk. Going by the usual prices for rusty old bits and bobs I'd doubt you'd have to pay more than a buck for one; I've gotten old auger bits for less.

Even without modification a spade bit of the right diameter I think would be fine as I presume the central hole wouldn't be visible after the rubber feet are in place. But since most spade bits are made of carbon steel they're easy to reshape by file if needed; even if made of HSS a grinder would make short work of the needed modifications (and there would be no worries there about overheating it during grinding).

Either way you could literally be done in five minutes after you got the bit home, well before ironing out the design of a router template, much less starting work on building it.

Reading the original post and your later comments, I think your best bet here would be to buy a spade bit specifically for this job and then modify it to suit your preferences.

This takes advantage of one of the key advantages of spade bits: their low cost. And this is even if you had to buy new, but rusty old ones are also very easy to find secondhand at yard sales, car-boot sales, in thrift stores or charity shops, in boxes of miscellaneous old tools or junk. Going by the usual prices for rusty old bits and bobs I'd doubt you'd have to pay more than a buck for one; I've gotten old auger bits for less.

Even without modification a spade bit of the right diameter I think would be fine as I presume the central hole wouldn't be visible after the rubber feet are in place. But since most spade bits are made of carbon steel they're easy to reshape by file if needed; even if made of HSS a grinder would make short work of the needed modifications (and there would be no worries there about overheating it during grinding).

Either way you could literally be done in five minutes after you got the bit home, well before ironing out the design of a router template, much less starting work on building it.

Two possible spade bit modifications:

Spade bit mods

The one on the left would leave a small depression in the centre, approximately the size that some Forstner bits create.

If this is not acceptable you could do the mod on the right, which will leave just a tiny pip of wood in the centre of the hole that would need to be pared off with a chisel. The reason I don't suggest this as the first thing to try is that without a central spur it will be much harder to accurately position a drill bit on a marked spot.

Source Link
Graphus
  • 56.6k
  • 2
  • 40
  • 129

Reading the original post and your later comments, I think your best bet here would be to buy a spade bit specifically for this job and then modify it to suit your preferences.

This takes advantage of one of the key advantages of spade bits: their low cost. And this is even if you had to buy new, but rusty old ones are also very easy to find secondhand at yard sales, car-boot sales, in thrift stores or charity shops, in boxes of miscellaneous old tools or junk. Going by the usual prices for rusty old bits and bobs I'd doubt you'd have to pay more than a buck for one; I've gotten old auger bits for less.

Even without modification a spade bit of the right diameter I think would be fine as I presume the central hole wouldn't be visible after the rubber feet are in place. But since most spade bits are made of carbon steel they're easy to reshape by file if needed; even if made of HSS a grinder would make short work of the needed modifications (and there would be no worries there about overheating it during grinding).

Either way you could literally be done in five minutes after you got the bit home, well before ironing out the design of a router template, much less starting work on building it.