added 202 characters in body
Source Link
rob
  • 18.5k
  • 5
  • 51
  • 124

You could easily make a fixture that aligns the end of your Dremel's flex shaft to drill the precise holes. It could be as simple as a grooved guide block that you tape or clamp in place while you slide the flex shaft along the groove to drill the hole.

If all else fails, here are a few more possible solutions to consider (though I'm not sure if this would have an impact on the sound quality since you're talking about a musical instrument, but here are a few more possible solutions to consider if the flexible drill and offset adapter solutions turn out to be impractical):

  1. Drill all the way through from the other side (from the left, in your picture--assuming that's possible), then plug the hole from that side using wood filler or a dowel.
  2. Cut off the part that will have the hole, drill the hole, then glue the part back on. (The cut would be a horizontal line in your diagram.)
  3. Similar to #2, cut off the very top part, use a router to carve out the channel (instead of drilling it), then glue the part back on.

I'm not sure if this would have an impact on the sound quality since you're talking about a musical instrument, but here are a few more possible solutions to consider if the flexible drill and offset adapter solutions turn out to be impractical:

  1. Drill all the way through from the other side (from the left, in your picture--assuming that's possible), then plug the hole from that side using wood filler or a dowel.
  2. Cut off the part that will have the hole, drill the hole, then glue the part back on. (The cut would be a horizontal line in your diagram.)
  3. Similar to #2, cut off the very top part, use a router to carve out the channel (instead of drilling it), then glue the part back on.

You could easily make a fixture that aligns the end of your Dremel's flex shaft to drill the precise holes. It could be as simple as a grooved guide block that you tape or clamp in place while you slide the flex shaft along the groove to drill the hole.

If all else fails, here are a few more possible solutions to consider (though I'm not sure if this would have an impact on the sound quality since you're talking about a musical instrument):

  1. Drill all the way through from the other side (from the left, in your picture--assuming that's possible), then plug the hole from that side using wood filler or a dowel.
  2. Cut off the part that will have the hole, drill the hole, then glue the part back on. (The cut would be a horizontal line in your diagram.)
  3. Similar to #2, cut off the very top part, use a router to carve out the channel (instead of drilling it), then glue the part back on.
Source Link
rob
  • 18.5k
  • 5
  • 51
  • 124

I'm not sure if this would have an impact on the sound quality since you're talking about a musical instrument, but here are a few more possible solutions to consider if the flexible drill and offset adapter solutions turn out to be impractical:

  1. Drill all the way through from the other side (from the left, in your picture--assuming that's possible), then plug the hole from that side using wood filler or a dowel.
  2. Cut off the part that will have the hole, drill the hole, then glue the part back on. (The cut would be a horizontal line in your diagram.)
  3. Similar to #2, cut off the very top part, use a router to carve out the channel (instead of drilling it), then glue the part back on.