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SaSSafraS1232
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If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force on the anchors will mainly be in shear (i.e. pulling them down), where they are stronger (unless the load on the shelf is significantly uneven biased towards the front).

Even if this is attached to the structure of the building I still think I would prefer design B, as you could get compression of the drywall over time with design A, leading to a wobbly shelf tilting out from the wall.)

If this is attached to masonry or concrete with appropriate anchors I think either design is more than strong enough.

If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force on the anchors will mainly be in shear (i.e. pulling them down), where they are stronger (unless the load on the shelf is significantly uneven biased towards the front).

Even if this is attached to the structure of the building I still think I would prefer design B, as you could get compression of the drywall over time with design A, leading to a wobbly shelf tilting out from the wall.)

If this is attached to masonry or concrete with appropriate anchors I think either design is more than strong enough.

If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force on the anchors will mainly be in shear (i.e. pulling them down), where they are stronger (unless the load on the shelf is significantly uneven biased towards the front).

Even if this is attached to the structure of the building I still think I would prefer design B, as you could get compression of the drywall over time with design A, leading to a wobbly shelf tilting out from the wall.

If this is attached to masonry or concrete with appropriate anchors I think either design is more than strong enough.

Source Link
SaSSafraS1232
  • 5.5k
  • 7
  • 21

If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force on the anchors will mainly be in shear (i.e. pulling them down), where they are stronger (unless the load on the shelf is significantly uneven biased towards the front).

Even if this is attached to the structure of the building I still think I would prefer design B, as you could get compression of the drywall over time with design A, leading to a wobbly shelf tilting out from the wall.)

If this is attached to masonry or concrete with appropriate anchors I think either design is more than strong enough.