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Dano0430
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Matt'sBowlturner's answer is really the best. When purchasing lumber from a quality lumberyard you can ask if the "resin has been set". There is a little extra heat & time applied. This would be possible with any woods that are typically heavy sap woods (pine cedar etc). Sometimes it's a little more work but you can find the wood that's had the extra heat applied. If not FWW has a nice article about using your oven. I also remember a woodtalkshow podcast where one of the guys who works at a lumberyard explained all this but I can't find the exact episode atm sorry.

Not enough rep to comment etc so yeah

Matt's answer is really the best. When purchasing lumber from a quality lumberyard you can ask if the "resin has been set". There is a little extra heat & time applied. This would be possible with any woods that are typically heavy sap woods (pine cedar etc). Sometimes it's a little more work but you can find the wood that's had the extra heat applied. If not FWW has a nice article about using your oven. I also remember a woodtalkshow podcast where one of the guys who works at a lumberyard explained all this but I can't find the exact episode atm sorry.

Not enough rep to comment etc so yeah

Bowlturner's answer is really the best. When purchasing lumber from a quality lumberyard you can ask if the "resin has been set". There is a little extra heat & time applied. This would be possible with any woods that are typically heavy sap woods (pine cedar etc). Sometimes it's a little more work but you can find the wood that's had the extra heat applied. If not FWW has a nice article about using your oven. I also remember a woodtalkshow podcast where one of the guys who works at a lumberyard explained all this but I can't find the exact episode atm sorry.

Not enough rep to comment etc so yeah

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Dano0430
  • 373
  • 1
  • 2
  • 11

Matt's answer is really the best. When purchasing lumber from a quality lumberyard you can ask if the "resin has been set". There is a little extra heat & time applied. This would be possible with any woods that are typically heavy sap woods (pine cedar etc). Sometimes it's a little more work but you can find the wood that's had the extra heat applied. If not FWW has a nice article about using your oven. I also remember a woodtalkshow podcast where one of the guys who works at a lumberyard explained all this but I can't find the exact episode atm sorry.

Not enough rep to comment etc so yeah